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Lord Robert Winston cautions that advances in infertility therapies may be hindered by over-regulation

Lord Professor Robert Winston cautions that advances in infertility treatments may be being hampered by unnecessary over-regulation, in an editorial accompanying a special issue of the journal Reproduction.

Walking a tightrope: universal thyroid testing could reduce pregnancy problems in some cases, but interfere with healthy pregnancies in others

Universal testing for thyroid function in pregnant women could reduce miscarriages and negative neurodevelopmental effects for the baby, but may also put healthy pregnancies at risk by prescribing unnecessary drugs to mothers. The debate ‘Pregnant women should be screened for thyroid hormones and antibodies’ will be held in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018, where two experts take opposing views on whether all pregnant women should be tested for abnormal thyroid function, or if this should only be offered to high risk mothers.

Transgender brains are more like their desired gender from an early age

Brain activity and structure in transgender adolescents more closely resembles the typical activation patterns of their desired gender, according to findings to be presented in Barcelona, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. These findings suggest that differences in brain function may occur early in development and that brain imaging may be a useful tool for earlier identification of transgenderism in young people.

Brain stimulation may reduce food cravings as obesity treatment

Stimulating the brain to alter its intrinsic reward system shows promise in the treatment of obesity, according to results presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The technique has yielded positive results after just a single treatment session, revealing its potential to become a safer alternative to treat obesity, avoiding invasive surgery and drug side effects.  

Larger waistlines are linked to higher risk of vitamin D deficiency

Higher levels of belly fat are associated with lower vitamin D levels in obese individuals, according to data presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The study reports that vitamin D levels are lower in individuals with higher levels of belly fat, and suggests that individuals, particularly the overweight with larger waistlines should have their vitamin D levels checked, to avoid any potentially health damaging effects.

Could intermittent fasting diets increase diabetes risk?

Fasting every other day to lose weight impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone, insulin, which may increase diabetes risk, according to data presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. These findings suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting such weight loss programmes.

Minimising exposure to common hormone-disrupting chemicals may reduce obesity rates

Everyday products carry environmental chemicals that may be making us fat by interfering with our hormones, according to research presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018.  Following recommendations on how to avoid these chemicals could help minimise exposure and potentially reduce the risk of obesity and its complications.

Brain development disorders in children linked to common environmental toxin exposures

Exposures of pregnant women and children to common thyroid-hormone-disrupting toxins may be linked to the increased incidence of brain development disorders, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections.

Children born to mothers with low vitamin D levels may develop autism-like behaviours

Low levels of vitamin D during pregnancy and breast feeding may be related to an unusual pattern of brain development that can lead to differences in social behaviour of children in later life, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Over-the-counter antihistamines linked to impaired fertility in men

Over-the-counter allergy drugs could have negative long-term side effects for male fertility, a review, published in the journal Reproduction, suggests.

Arthritis drug can lower sugar levels in diabetes

A common rheumatoid arthritis treatment may be an effective new therapy for lowering blood glucose levels of patients with type-2 diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Potential new target for reducing osteoporosis risk in men

Researchers have identified a new regulator of vitamin D metabolism that could be targeted to reduce the risk of osteoporosis in men undergoing prostate cancer therapy, according to a study published in the Journal of Molecular Endocrinology.

Successful male infertility treatment does not lower fertility of sons

The most common procedure for treating infertility in men does not adversely affect the fertility of their sons, according to a review published in the journal Reproduction. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is the most effective and successful treatment for male infertility and this review reports that there is no clear evidence for any adverse effects on the fertility of boys conceived using the procedure.

Warm temperatures can lead to misdiagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy

Environmental temperatures of over 25 degrees are associated with a significant increase in the risk of being misdiagnosed with gestational diabetes during pregnancy, data published in the European Journal of Endocrinology suggests. Misdiagnosis of the condition could lead to unnecessary insulin treatment and avoidable distress for prospective mothers.

Guidelines for management of recurrent pituitary tumours recommend new drug as first line treatment

New guidelines for managing recurrent pituitary tumours identify the drug temozolomide, as first line chemotherapy treatment. The guidelines, published in the European Journal of Endocrinology and produced by the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE), include a series of recommendations aimed at improving survival rates and quality of life for patients, through early identification of tumours and more effective treatment strategies.

Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may reduce fertility of daughters

Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may impair the future fertility of female offspring, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections. The article reviews three separate rodent studies that all report altered development in the reproductive systems of female offspring from mothers given paracetamol during pregnancy, which may impair their fertility in adulthood.

Link found between morning sickness, smoking and healthy pregnancies

A link between the ‘old wives’ tale that morning sickness may indicate a healthy pregnancy, and the reason smoking is so detrimental has been found, according to a review published in the Journal of Molecular Endocrinology. The article discusses the importance of the hormone endokinin for healthy pregnancies, its role in causing morning sickness, and how its normal function may be adversely affected by smoking, leading to poor outcomes in pregnancy.

High fat diet during childhood may increase PCOS risk later in life

Eating a high fat diet during childhood may increase the risk of developing polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) later in life, according to a study published in the journal Reproduction. This research highlights the importance of a healthy diet and indicates that early lifestyle changes may prevent PCOS in women.

Early pregnancy test for cows improves welfare and food production

Early pregnancy detection is vital in the cattle industry and improves animal welfare, whilst reducing consumer costs. A simpler, cheaper and safer early pregnancy test, has successfully advanced cattle farming over the last six years, with sales now exceeding $10 million per annum. The development of this test was borne from the discovery of a protein critical for pregnancy success, over 30 years ago.

Treating PCOS with a combination of oral contraceptives and spironolactone does not increase the risk of diabetes or heart disease

In women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most effective treatment is a combination of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) with an anti-androgen, which does not increase the risk of metabolic or cardiovascular complications, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The findings should lead to more women being prescribed the most effective treatment for their condition.

International collaboration release revised guideline for improved management of Turner syndrome

A comprehensive, international guideline that incorporates the most up-to-date knowledge on diagnosis, treatment and patient impact of Turner syndrome (TS) has been published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The guideline project was initiated by the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) and the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES), in collaboration with six other learned societies, to incorporate the latest evidence-based advice for diagnosis and treatment of girls and women with TS.

Vitamin D supplements could help pain management

Vitamin D supplementation combined with good sleeping habits may help manage pain-related diseases, according to a review in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Breast cancer risk is more affected by total body fat than abdominal fat

According to a study published in Endocrine-Related Cancer, levels of several breast cancer risk markers were reduced in postmenopausal women who lost total body fat, rather than just belly fat. 

New nanotechnology application for difficult-to-treat cancers

A new treatment combining shock waves with nanoparticles can successfully treat tumours that are difficult to target using conventional chemotherapy, according to a study published in Endocrine-Related Cancer.

Just six months of frequent exercise improves men’s sperm quality

Sedentary men who start exercising between three and five times per week improve their sperm counts and other measures of sperm quality in just a few months, according to a new study published today in Reproduction.

Consuming more than two soft drinks a day can double risk of diabetes

Drinking more than two soft drinks per day – whether sugary or artificially sweetened – can double the risk of developing two types of diabetes, according to a new study published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

 

Age-related scarring in ovaries may explain reproductive decline

Women may be losing their ability to produce healthy eggs later in life due to excessive scarring – or fibrosis - and inflammation in their ovaries, according to a study in mice published today in Reproduction. These findings could pave the way for new treatments that delay ovarian ageing.

Happy cows make more nutritious milk

Daily infusions with a chemical commonly associated with feelings of happiness were shown to increase calcium levels in the blood of Holstein cows and the milk of Jersey cows that had just given birth. The results, published in the Journal of Endocrinology, could lead to a better understanding of how to improve the health of dairy cows, and keep the milk flowing.

Third of pregnant women iron deficient; risk thyroid-related pregnancy complications

A third of pregnant women have iron deficiency, putting them at increased risk of having a thyroid disorder and suffering complications such as miscarriages and preterm births. These are the conclusions of a new study published today in European Journal of Endocrinology.

New recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of Adrenal Incidentalomas published in the European Journal of Endocrinology

The appropriate clinical response to adrenal incidentaloma should depend on the likelihood of malignancy, according to new guidelines published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology and first presented at ESE’s annual European Congress of Endocrinology in May 2016.

Diabetes associated with increased risk of serious bacterial blood infection

Patients with diabetes are almost three times more susceptible to life-threatening blood infections by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, according to a study published today in European Journal of Endocrinology. These findings could indicate a need for greater infection surveillance among long-term diabetes patients.

Breast cancer risk higher in women with overactive thyroid

High levels of thyroid hormone are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women, according to a 36 yearlong study of more than four million women published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

Sitting down for long periods when pregnant linked to weight gain and depression

Women suffering from symptoms of depression during pregnancy are more likely to sit down for long periods of time in the second trimester, putting them at risk of greater weight gain and contracting gestational diabetes, according to a new study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

New drug provides safer alternative to conventional IVF treatment

The hormone kisspeptin could be a safer and more effective way for harvesting eggs during IVF treatment, according to a new study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

Enzyme potential target for fight against obesity and diabetes

Removing an enzyme that controls bile acid and hormone levels significantly protects female mice from weight gain, according to a new study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh. The finding offers a new a therapeutic target in the fight against obesity.

Bursts of high-intensity exercise could help diabetes patients manage low blood sugar levels

People with type-1 diabetes could regain their ability to tell when blood sugar levels are low by regularly doing short bursts of high-intensity exercise, according to a preliminary study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference. The findings could lead to a non-drug based treatment for a potentially life-threatening condition.

Soybean foods may protect menopausal women against osteoporosis

Eating a diet rich in both soy protein and isoflavones can protect menopausal women from bone weakening and osteoporosis, according to the results of a preliminary study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

Vitamin D pill a day may improve exercise performance and lower risk of heart disease

Taking vitamin D supplements can improve exercise performance and lower the risk of heart disease, according to the findings of a preliminary study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

Injection of appetite gene may offer a more effective alternative to dieting

Increasing the amount of appetite hormone, leptin, in the brain causes long-term weight loss without the bone weakening which is a common side effect of weight loss by dieting, according to a study published today in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Hyperthyroidism could be great cost to countries in disability benefits

People diagnosed with hyperthyroidism are 88% more likely to receive disability benefits than people without the condition; reports a Danish study published this week in the European Journal of Endocrinology

Mother’s hormone levels predict child’s ability to do maths

Children born to mothers with low levels of thyroid hormones during pregnancy are 60 % more likely to do badly in arithmetic tests when they reach school age as children born to mothers with normal levels of the hormone; according to a study published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology.