NEWS AND PRESS RELEASES

Full list of Press Releases

Mother’s hormone levels predict child’s ability to do maths

Published on 28 Aug 2015

Children born to mothers with low levels of thyroid hormones during pregnancy are 60 % more likely to do badly in arithmetic tests when they reach school age as children born to mothers with normal levels of the hormone; according to a study published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

Hyperthyroidism could be great cost to countries in disability benefits

Published on 28 Sep 2015

People diagnosed with hyperthyroidism are 88% more likely to receive disability benefits than people without the condition; reports a Danish study published this week in the European Journal of Endocrinology

Injection of appetite gene may offer a more effective alternative to dieting

Published on 26 Oct 2015

Increasing the amount of appetite hormone, leptin, in the brain causes long-term weight loss without the bone weakening which is a common side effect of weight loss by dieting, according to a study published today in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Breast cancer risk higher in women with overactive thyroid

Published on 09 Feb 2016

High levels of thyroid hormone are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women, according to a 36 yearlong study of more than four million women published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

Diabetes associated with increased risk of serious bacterial blood infection

Published on 16 Mar 2016

Patients with diabetes are almost three times more susceptible to life-threatening blood infections by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, according to a study published today in European Journal of Endocrinology. These findings could indicate a need for greater infection surveillance among long-term diabetes patients.

Vitamin D pill a day may improve exercise performance and lower risk of heart disease

Published on 12 Jul 2016

Taking vitamin D supplements can improve exercise performance and lower the risk of heart disease, according to the findings of a preliminary study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

Soybean foods may protect menopausal women against osteoporosis

Published on 12 Jul 2016

Eating a diet rich in both soy protein and isoflavones can protect menopausal women from bone weakening and osteoporosis, according to the results of a preliminary study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

Bursts of high-intensity exercise could help diabetes patients manage low blood sugar levels

Published on 12 Jul 2016

People with type-1 diabetes could regain their ability to tell when blood sugar levels are low by regularly doing short bursts of high-intensity exercise, according to a preliminary study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference. The findings could lead to a non-drug based treatment for a potentially life-threatening condition.

Enzyme potential target for fight against obesity and diabetes

Published on 12 Jul 2016

Removing an enzyme that controls bile acid and hormone levels significantly protects female mice from weight gain, according to a new study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh. The finding offers a new a therapeutic target in the fight against obesity.

New drug provides safer alternative to conventional IVF treatment

Published on 12 Jul 2016

The hormone kisspeptin could be a safer and more effective way for harvesting eggs during IVF treatment, according to a new study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

Sitting down for long periods when pregnant linked to weight gain and depression

Published on 12 Jul 2016

Women suffering from symptoms of depression during pregnancy are more likely to sit down for long periods of time in the second trimester, putting them at risk of greater weight gain and contracting gestational diabetes, according to a new study presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Edinburgh.

New recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of Adrenal Incidentalomas published in the European Journal of Endocrinology

Published on 12 Jul 2016

The appropriate clinical response to adrenal incidentaloma should depend on the likelihood of malignancy, according to new guidelines published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology and first presented at ESE’s annual European Congress of Endocrinology in May 2016.

Third of pregnant women iron deficient; risk thyroid-related pregnancy complications

Published on 29 Jul 2016

A third of pregnant women have iron deficiency, putting them at increased risk of having a thyroid disorder and suffering complications such as miscarriages and preterm births. These are the conclusions of a new study published today in European Journal of Endocrinology.

Happy cows make more nutritious milk

Published on 29 Jul 2016

Daily infusions with a chemical commonly associated with feelings of happiness were shown to increase calcium levels in the blood of Holstein cows and the milk of Jersey cows that had just given birth. The results, published in the Journal of Endocrinology, could lead to a better understanding of how to improve the health of dairy cows, and keep the milk flowing.

Age-related scarring in ovaries may explain reproductive decline

Published on 05 Aug 2016

Women may be losing their ability to produce healthy eggs later in life due to excessive scarring – or fibrosis - and inflammation in their ovaries, according to a study in mice published today in Reproduction. These findings could pave the way for new treatments that delay ovarian ageing.

Consuming more than two soft drinks a day can double risk of diabetes

Published on 25 Oct 2016

Drinking more than two soft drinks per day – whether sugary or artificially sweetened – can double the risk of developing two types of diabetes, according to a new study published today in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

Just six months of frequent exercise improves men’s sperm quality

Published on 14 Dec 2016

Sedentary men who start exercising between three and five times per week improve their sperm counts and other measures of sperm quality in just a few months, according to a new study published today in Reproduction.

New nanotechnology application for difficult-to-treat cancers

Published on 10 May 2017

A new treatment combining shock waves with nanoparticles can successfully treat tumours that are difficult to target using conventional chemotherapy, according to a study published in Endocrine-Related Cancer.

Breast cancer risk is more affected by total body fat than abdominal fat

Published on 17 May 2017

According to a study published in Endocrine-Related Cancer, levels of several breast cancer risk markers were reduced in postmenopausal women who lost total body fat, rather than just belly fat.

Vitamin D supplements could help pain management

Published on 24 May 2017

Vitamin D supplementation combined with good sleeping habits may help manage pain-related diseases, according to a review in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Treating PCOS with a combination of oral contraceptives and spironolactone does not increase the risk of diabetes or heart disease

Published on 15 Sep 2017

In women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most effective treatment is a combination of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) with an anti-androgen, which does not increase the risk of metabolic or cardiovascular complications, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The findings should lead to more women being prescribed the most effective treatment for their condition.

International collaboration release revised guideline for improved management of Turner syndrome

Published on 15 Sep 2017

A comprehensive, international guideline that incorporates the most up-to-date knowledge on diagnosis, treatment and patient impact of Turner syndrome (TS) has been published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The guideline project was initiated by the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) and the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES), in collaboration with six other learned societies, to incorporate the latest evidence-based advice for diagnosis and treatment of girls and women with TS.

Early pregnancy test for cows improves welfare and food production

Published on 13 Oct 2017

Early pregnancy detection is vital in the cattle industry and improves animal welfare, whilst reducing consumer costs. A simpler, cheaper and safer early pregnancy test, has successfully advanced cattle farming over the last six years, with sales now exceeding $10 million per annum. The development of this test was borne from the discovery of a protein critical for pregnancy success, over 30 years ago.

High fat diet during childhood may increase PCOS risk later in life

Published on 11 Dec 2017

Eating a high fat diet during childhood may increase the risk of developing polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) later in life, according to a study published in the journal Reproduction. This research highlights the importance of a healthy diet and indicates that early lifestyle changes may prevent PCOS in women.

Link found between morning sickness, smoking and healthy pregnancies

Published on 19 Dec 2017

A link between the ‘old wives’ tale that morning sickness may indicate a healthy pregnancy, and the reason smoking is so detrimental has been found, according to a review published in the Journal of Molecular Endocrinology. The article discusses the importance of the hormone endokinin for healthy pregnancies, its role in causing morning sickness, and how its normal function may be adversely affected by smoking, leading to poor outcomes in pregnancy.

Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may reduce fertility of daughters

Published on 08 Jan 2018

Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may impair the future fertility of female offspring, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections. The article reviews three separate rodent studies that all report altered development in the reproductive systems of female offspring from mothers given paracetamol during pregnancy, which may impair their fertility in adulthood.

Guidelines for management of recurrent pituitary tumours recommend new drug as first line treatment

Published on 10 Jan 2018

New guidelines for managing recurrent pituitary tumours identify the drug temozolomide, as first line chemotherapy treatment. The guidelines, published in the European Journal of Endocrinology and produced by the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE), include a series of recommendations aimed at improving survival rates and quality of life for patients, through early identification of tumours and more effective treatment strategies.

Warm temperatures can lead to misdiagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy

Published on 23 Jan 2018

Environmental temperatures of over 25 degrees are associated with a significant increase in the risk of being misdiagnosed with gestational diabetes during pregnancy, data published in the European Journal of Endocrinology suggests. Misdiagnosis of the condition could lead to unnecessary insulin treatment and avoidable distress for prospective mothers.

Successful male infertility treatment does not lower fertility of sons

Published on 23 Jan 2018

The most common procedure for treating infertility in men does not adversely affect the fertility of their sons, according to a review published in the journal Reproduction. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is the most effective and successful treatment for male infertility and this review reports that there is no clear evidence for any adverse effects on the fertility of boys conceived using the procedure.

Potential new target for reducing osteoporosis risk in men

Published on 31 Jan 2018

Researchers have identified a new regulator of vitamin D metabolism that could be targeted to reduce the risk of osteoporosis in men undergoing prostate cancer therapy, according to a study published in the Journal of Molecular Endocrinology.

Arthritis drug can lower sugar levels in diabetes

Published on 27 Feb 2018

A common rheumatoid arthritis treatment may be an effective new therapy for lowering blood glucose levels of patients with type-2 diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Over-the-counter antihistamines linked to impaired fertility in men

Published on 06 Mar 2018

Over-the-counter allergy drugs could have negative long-term side effects for male fertility, a review, published in the journal Reproduction, suggests.

Children born to mothers with low vitamin D levels may develop autism-like behaviours

Published on 28 Mar 2018

Low levels of vitamin D during pregnancy and breast feeding may be related to an unusual pattern of brain development that can lead to differences in social behaviour of children in later life, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology.

Brain development disorders in children linked to common environmental toxin exposures

Published on 28 Mar 2018

Exposures of pregnant women and children to common thyroid-hormone-disrupting toxins may be linked to the increased incidence of brain development disorders, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections.

Could intermittent fasting diets increase diabetes risk?

Published on 30 May 2018

Fasting every other day to lose weight impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone, insulin, which may increase diabetes risk, according to data presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. These findings suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting such weight loss programmes.

Minimising exposure to common hormone-disrupting chemicals may reduce obesity rates

Published on 30 May 2018

Everyday products carry environmental chemicals that may be making us fat by interfering with our hormones, according to research presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018.  Following recommendations on how to avoid these chemicals could help minimise exposure and potentially reduce the risk of obesity and its complications.

Brain stimulation may reduce food cravings as obesity treatment

Published on 30 May 2018

Stimulating the brain to alter its intrinsic reward system shows promise in the treatment of obesity, according to results presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The technique has yielded positive results after just a single treatment session, revealing its potential to become a safer alternative to treat obesity, avoiding invasive surgery and drug side effects.

Larger waistlines are linked to higher risk of vitamin D deficiency

Published on 30 May 2018

Higher levels of belly fat are associated with lower vitamin D levels in obese individuals, according to data presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The study reports that vitamin D levels are lower in individuals with higher levels of belly fat, and suggests that individuals, particularly the overweight with larger waistlines should have their vitamin D levels checked, to avoid any potentially health damaging effects.

Transgender brains are more like their desired gender from an early age

Published on 30 May 2018

Brain activity and structure in transgender adolescents more closely resembles the typical activation patterns of their desired gender, according to findings to be presented in Barcelona, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. These findings suggest that differences in brain function may occur early in development and that brain imaging may be a useful tool for earlier identification of transgenderism in young people.

Walking a tightrope: universal thyroid testing could reduce pregnancy problems in some cases, but interfere with healthy pregnancies in others

Published on 30 May 2018

Universal testing for thyroid function in pregnant women could reduce miscarriages and negative neurodevelopmental effects for the baby, but may also put healthy pregnancies at risk by prescribing unnecessary drugs to mothers. The debate ‘Pregnant women should be screened for thyroid hormones and antibodies’ will be held in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018, where two experts take opposing views on whether all pregnant women should be tested for abnormal thyroid function, or if this should only be offered to high risk mothers.

New link identified between inflammation and depression in type-1 diabetes

Published on 07 Jun 2018

Depression in type-1 diabetes patients is associated with higher levels of the inflammatory protein galectin-3, according to research published in Endocrine Connections. These findings suggest that galectin-3 levels may be useful for diagnosis of depression or may be a new target for treating depression associated with type-1 diabetes, which could lead to better patient care.

Lord Robert Winston cautions that advances in infertility therapies may be hindered by over-regulation

Published on 16 Aug 2018

Lord Professor Robert Winston cautions that advances in infertility treatments may be being hampered by unnecessary over-regulation, in an editorial accompanying a special issue of the journal Reproduction.

Bad habits in childhood may lead to an ‘unhealthy’ balance of gut bacteria and increase health risks in later life

Published on 03 Oct 2018

Preliminary data suggests that a child’s sleeping, eating and fitness habits can influence the balance of bacteria found in their gut as teenagers, according to research presented today at the 57th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. These findings indicate that maintaining healthy lifestyle habits during childhood may promote a healthy balance of gut bacteria later in life, which in turn may contribute to lowering the risks of developing serious long-term conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Vitamin B supplements may protect kidney function in children with diabetes

Published on 03 Oct 2018

Vitamin B supplements have a protective effect on kidney function in children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes, according to research presented today at the 57th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. These findings indicate that simple supplementation of vitamin B complex may protect against the development and progression of kidney disease in children with diabetes, which could promote improved health and quality of life in adulthood.

Vitamin D supplements may promote weight loss in obese children

Published on 03 Oct 2018

Vitamin D supplements may promote weight loss and reduce risk factors for future heart and metabolic disease in overweight and obese children, according to research presented today at the 57th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. These findings indicate that simple vitamin D supplementation may be part of an effective strategy to tackle childhood obesity and reduce the risk of serious health problems, such as heart disease, in adulthood.

Too much vitamin A may increase risk of bone fractures

Published on 10 Oct 2018

Consuming too much vitamin A may decrease bone thickness, leading to weak and fracture prone bones, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. The study, undertaken in mice, found that sustained intake of vitamin A, at levels equivalent to 4.5-13 times the human recommended daily allowance (RDA), caused significant weakening of the bones, and suggests that people should be cautious of over-supplementing vitamin A in their diets.

Diabetic patients are more at risk of death from alcohol, accidents and suicide

Published on 16 Oct 2018

Diabetic patients are more likely to die from alcohol-related factors, accidents or suicide, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The study findings suggest that the increased risk of death from these causes may be related to the mental health of patients, which may be adversely affected by the psychological burden of living with and self-treating this debilitating disease, with potentially serious complications.

Oestrogens in cows’ milk are unlikely to pose a threat to adult health

Published on 29 Oct 2018

Oestrogens found naturally in cows’ milk are likely to be safe for human consumption in adults, according to a new review published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The review brings together scientific evidence from over a dozen rodent and human studies that examined the effects of ingesting oestrogen-containing cows’ milk on fertility and the risk of cancer development. The findings of the review suggest that the levels of oestrogens found naturally in milk are too low to pose health risks to adults, and that there is no need for public concern.

Women more resilient to extreme physical activity than previously reported

Published on 30 Nov 2018

Women that underwent extreme physical training and completed a transantarctic expedition did not show any more negative health effects than would be expected in men, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study is the first to suggest that women are not more susceptible to the negative effects of physical exertion and, that with appropriate training and preparation, can be as resilient as men in undertaking arduous physical activity.

Good nutrition could protect children from cognitive difficulties caused by early-life stress

Published on 30 Nov 2018

Good nutrition in early life may protect against stress-induced changes in brain development in young mice, according to data presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggests that a nutrient-rich diet may have protective effects on brain development in young mice exposed to early-life stress, which reduces their risk of learning and memory issues in later life.

Routine vitamin B12 screening may prevent irreversible nerve damage in type-2 diabetes

Published on 30 Nov 2018

Patients with type-2 diabetes, taking metformin, should have their vitamin B12 levels assessed more regularly to avoid irreversible nerve damage, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that earlier detection of vitamin B12 deficiency through routine screening of all metformin-treated, type-2 diabetes patients could reduce their risk of developing irreversible, painful and potentially disabling nerve damage.

Debate - Is the gut or the brain more important in regulating appetite and metabolism?

Published on 04 Dec 2018

Whether gut or brain hormones are more important for the regulation of appetite and metabolism is not clearly defined.  Imbalances in the control of appetite and metabolism can lead to obesity and diabetes, which have a negative impact on people’s health and healthcare costs. In a live debate to be held at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow, leading experts will debate this issue in a session entitled, ‘This house believes that the gut is the conductor of the endocrine orchestra.’  The experts will explore the evidence supporting the roles of gut and brain hormones in metabolism, and discuss how best to target future research and treatment strategies for overweight and diabetic patients.

Skin inflammation may increase your risk of type-2 diabetes

Published on 04 Dec 2018

Inflammatory skin disorders, such as psoriasis, may directly increase the risk of type-2 diabetes, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings indicate that improving skin health could be of major importance for the control of blood sugar and lowering diabetes risk.  

Antioxidants may prevent cognitive impairment in diabetes

Published on 04 Dec 2018

Cognitive difficulties in patients with diabetes, caused by repeated episodes of low blood sugar, could be reduced with antioxidants, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that stimulating antioxidant defences in mice reduces cognitive impairments caused by low blood sugar, which could help to improve the quality of life for diabetic patients.

Mentally tiring work may increase diabetes risk in women

Published on 13 Mar 2019

Women who find their jobs mentally tiring are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The study findings suggest that mentally draining work, such as teaching, may increase the risk of diabetes in women. This suggests that employers and women should be more aware of the potential health risks associated with mentally tiring work.

Obesity risk may be increased by exposure to common environmental chemicals

Published on 01 Jul 2019

Exposure to common every day chemicals, called phthalates, may increase the risk of metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The study found a correlation between levels of phthalate exposure and markers of impaired liver function, as well as indicators of increased risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. These findings suggest that more actions may need to be taken to reduce people’s exposure to these potentially harmful, yet commonly used chemicals.

Breastfeeding reduces long-term risk of heart disease in mothers

Published on 01 Jul 2019

Women who breastfed their babies are less likely to develop heart disease later in life, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The study also suggests that the protective effect on heart health is increased in women who breastfed for longer periods of time. These findings provide further evidence for the long-term health benefits of breastfeeding and that women should be encouraged to do so when possible.

Setting fair regulations for top female athletes that have naturally higher testosterone levels

Published on 01 Jul 2019

Top performing female athletes are more likely to have naturally occurring higher testosterone levels, which sporting regulations should take into account, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The researchers show that top female athletes are more likely to have higher testosterone levels and mild disorders, as well as more severe and rarer conditions that increase testosterone levels. These findings suggest that higher testosterone levels can enhance physical performance in women, to levels more comparable to male physiology, and raises questions on how to ensure fairness of competition in women’s sport.

Environmental toxins can impair sexual development and fertility of future generations

Published on 01 Jul 2019

Exposure to environmental pollutants can cause alterations in brain development that affect sexual development and fertility for several generations, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The offspring of pregnant rats exposed to a mixture of common endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), at doses equivalent to those commonly experienced by people, showed impairments in sexual development and maternal behaviour that were passed on through several generations. These findings suggest that current levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in our environment may already be causing long-lasting harm and that people and agencies should take measures to minimise exposure.

Sleep problems in teenagers reversed in just one week by limiting screen use

Published on 01 Jul 2019

Sleep in teenagers can be improved by just one week of limiting their evening exposure to light-emitting screens on phones, tablets and computers, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The study indicates that by simply limiting their exposure to blue-light emitting devices in the evening, adolescents can improve their sleep quality and reduce symptoms of fatigue, lack of concentration and bad mood, after just one week.

Men ignore serious health risks of steroid abuse in pursuit of the body beautiful

Published on 01 Jul 2019

Many men continue to abuse steroids despite knowing that they have serious, life-limiting and potentially lethal side effects, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The study findings indicate that men using anabolic steroids to improve strength and physical performance are often aware of the side effects but choose to continue taking them. This raises serious concerns not only for their own health but that of future generations, since side effects are known to damage sperm as well as increase the risk of sexual dysfunction, heart disease and liver damage.

Protective effect of breastfeeding on childhood obesity risk linked to leptin gene modification

Published on 24 Oct 2019

Breastfed children have a lower risk of obesity, which may be linked to reduced expression of the hormone, leptin; according to research presented today at the 58th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. The study reported that genetic modifications known to suppress leptin levels were more common in breastfed babies than formula-fed, and that these differences may play a role in the development of obesity. Understanding the link between genetic modification of leptin and obesity risk could advance strategies to prevent and treat childhood obesity and, its complications, in the future; as prevention is better than cure.

Smoking during pregnancy may damage daughters’ future fertility

Published on 24 Oct 2019

Baby girls, born to mothers who smoked during pregnancy, exhibit signs of increased testosterone exposure, which may affect their hormone and reproductive function, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. The findings of this study suggest that cigarette is an endocrine disruptor that can masculinise girls in the womb and that daughters of women that smoked during pregnancy may suffer from hormonal and reproductive health problems in the long-term.

Probiotic supplements may enhance weight loss in obese children

Published on 24 Oct 2019

Probiotic supplements may enhance weight loss and improve the metabolic health of obese children following a diet and exercise plan, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. The findings of this small trial suggest that probiotic supplements may help obese children lose body weight and also reduce their risk of future metabolic conditions, including type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Limiting mealtimes may increase your motivation for exercise

Published on 30 Oct 2019

Limiting access to food in mice increases levels of the hormone, ghrelin, which may also increase motivation to exercise, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. The study suggests that a surge in levels of appetite-promoting hormone, ghrelin, after a period of fasting prompted mice to initiate voluntary exercise. These novel findings indicate that better diet control, for example limiting food intake to mealtimes or fasting intermittently, could help overweight people maintain a more effective exercise routine, lose weight and avoid debilitating complications such as diabetes and heart disease.

Age is not a barrier to the benefits of weight-loss surgery

Published on 15 Nov 2019

While weight-loss surgeries are not usually performed in people above the age of 65, a new study shows that these procedures can lead to successful weight loss and better diabetes control in older adults. The study, presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton, UK, indicates that elderly patients treated with bariatric surgery (gastric bypass or gastric sleeve) can recover well and have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications, including heart disease and diabetes.

New insights into cause and treatments for aggressive form of breast cancer

Published on 15 Nov 2019

Potential environmental risk factors and new targets for treating an aggressive form of breast cancer have been identified, according to new data presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton. The study suggests that exposure to common chemicals in our everyday environment may increase the risk of developing a difficult to treat type of breast cancer and highlights strategies for new treatment using combination therapy.

Stress with disrupted body clock increases risk of metabolic disease

Published on 15 Nov 2019

Everyday stress coupled with disruptions to the body’s internal clock may increase the risks of developing metabolic disorders including obesity and type 2 diabetes, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton. These mouse data indicate that environmental stress coupled with alterations in normal body clock function can affect food intake, promote weight gain and have long-lasting effects on stress responses. This may help explain why shift-work, jet lag and chronic stress in people can lead to metabolic disorders, as well as highlight therapeutic targets to investigate for future treatment.

Impaired liver function during pregnancy may increase risk of childhood obesity

Published on 21 Nov 2019

Impaired liver function during pregnancy may alter gut bacteria composition and increase the risk of obesity in children, according to results presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference. In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired, particularly when they were fed a Western-style, high-fat diet. These findings suggest that children at risk should maintain a healthy diet and that interventions to alter gut bacteria may help reduce childhood obesity rates in the future.

Vitamin B12 deficiency linked to obesity during pregnancy

Published on 21 Nov 2019

Vitamin B12 deficiency impairs fat metabolism and may be associated with obesity during pregnancy, according to findings presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference. Pregnant women with low levels of vitamin B12 had metabolic markers indicative of increased fat production and reduced breakdown, which suggests that low vitamin B12 levels could predispose pregnant women to obesity. These findings highlight the importance for pregnant women to consume a diet rich in vitamin B12 to help prevent obesity and its related adverse health complications in the long term.

Common anti-inflammatory may increase risk of diabetes

Published on 21 Nov 2019

A commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory may increase the risk of diabetes after just one week of treatment, according to new findings presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference. Healthy men given doses of the drug comparable to those used to treat inflammatory disorders had changes in markers of blood sugar metabolism associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. The study findings highlight the potential long-term health implications for people regularly taking these drugs and that medical professionals may need to consider and monitor the potential side-effects, to avoid future debilitating conditions.

Mindfulness helps obese children lose weight

Published on 06 Dec 2019

Mindfulness-based therapy may help reduce stress, appetite and body weight in children with obesity and anxiety, according to a study published in Endocrine Connections. They reported that obese children on a calorie-restricted diet alongside mindfulness therapy lose more weight and are less stressed and hungry, than children on a calorie-restricted diet alone. These findings suggest that mindfulness has potential to help obese children lose more weight through dieting and may reduce their risk of serious health issues, such as high blood pressure or stroke, although further research is needed to confirm this.

Larger thighs associated with lower risk of heart disease in obesity

Published on 06 Apr 2020

A larger thigh circumference may be associated with lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of heart disease in people with obesity, according to a study published in Endocrine Connections. In overweight and obese Chinese men and women, larger thigh circumferences were associated with lower blood pressure. These findings suggest that carrying more weight on the thighs may be a marker of better heart health in Chinese obese and overweight people, who are at a greater risk of heart disease. Thigh circumference may be useful for targeting obese and overweight people for earlier detection high blood pressure.

COVID-19 severity is increased in patients with mild obesity

Published on 16 Jul 2020

The risk of greater COVID-19 severity and death is higher in people with any obese body mass index (BMI), according to a study to be published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The study findings showed that BMI over 30 was associated with a significantly higher risk of respiratory failure, admission to intensive care and death in COVID-19 patients, regardless of age, gender and other associated diseases. The current guidelines for identifying those at higher risk in the UK are set at a BMI of 40 but these data suggest people with BMI over 30 should also be classified as at risk.

Thyroid inflammation linked to anxiety disorders

Published on 11 Aug 2020

Patients with autoimmune inflammation of their thyroid may be at greater risk of developing anxiety, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that people with anxiety may also have inflammation in their thyroid gland that can be reduced by taking the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, ibuprofen. These findings suggest that thyroid function may play an important role in the development of anxiety disorders and that thyroid inflammation should be investigated as an underlying factor in psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety.

Evaluating hormone-related targets & risks associated with COVID-19

Published on 09 Sep 2020

The evidence for hormone involvement in COVID-19 infection and treatment will be evaluated and discussed by endocrine experts in a dedicated COVID-19 session at e-ECE 2020. The European Society of Endocrinology’s annual meeting is going online 5-9 September 2020 and the e-ECE 2020 programme will feature cutting-edge science and the latest in clinical practice and patient care. This includes a new, dedicated COVID-19 session, where experts in the field will present, summarise and examine evidence for the role of the endocrine system and hormones in COVID-19 infection risk, disease severity and potential treatment.

Ghrelin may be an effective treatment for age-related muscle loss

Published on 09 Sep 2020

The hormone, ghrelin, may help protect the elderly population from muscle loss, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that administering a particular form of ghrelin to older mice helped to restore muscle mass and strength. As muscle-related diseases are a serious health concern in the elderly population, these findings suggest a potential new treatment strategy for muscle loss to enable the aging population to remain fit and healthy.

Probiotics may help manage childhood obesity

Published on 09 Sep 2020

Probiotics may help children and adolescents with obesity lose weight when taken alongside a calorie-controlled diet, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that obese children who were put on a calorie-restricted diet and given probiotics Bifidobacterium breve BR03 and Bifidobacterium breve B632, lost more weight and had improved insulin sensitivity compared with children on a diet only. These findings suggest that probiotic supplements and a calorie-controlled diet may help manage obesity in the younger population and reduce future health risks, such as heart disease and diabetes.

Skin lightening products linked to altered steroid hormone levels

Published on 09 Sep 2020

Women who misuse corticosteroid creams for cosmetic skin lightening may be at risk of developing adrenal insufficiency, according to research presented at e-ECE 2020. Women that frequently used high strength steroid creams had significantly lower baseline cortisol levels, a sign of impaired cortisol function. Low cortisol and adrenal insufficiency is a serious condition that causes extreme fatigue and can even lead to death. These findings suggest that better education on the side effects of steroid creams is needed to prevent these women from seriously damaging their health.

Vitamin D levels in the blood can predict future health risks & death

Published on 09 Sep 2020

Free, circulating vitamin D levels in the blood may be a better predictor of future health risks in aging men, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. These data suggest the free, precursor form of vitamin D found circulating in the bloodstream is a more accurate predictor of future health and disease risk, than the often measured total vitamin D. Since vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple serious health conditions as we get older, this study suggests that further investigation into vitamin D levels and their link to poor health may be a promising area for further research.

COVID-19 infection may impair fertility in men

Published on 02 Feb 2021

COVID-19 may negatively affect sperm quality and impair fertility in men, according to research published in Reproduction. The study indicates that COVID-19 infection can cause increased sperm cell death, inflammation, and oxidative stress, resulting in lower sperm quality and potentially impairing fertility. These findings provide the first, direct experimental evidence that the male reproductive system could be targeted and damaged by COVID-19, and suggest that men’s reproductive function should be evaluated after infection to detect and avoid further fertility problems.

Obesity is linked to heavy periods and impaired womb repair

Published on 12 Apr 2021

Obesity is linked to heavier periods and may be caused by delayed repair of the womb lining, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. Using a combined approach, assessing both women and mice, the study suggests an association between higher body weight and greater menstrual blood loss that may result from increased inflammation in the womb lining, delaying its repair. Although the study did not examine whether weight loss or anti-inflammatory medications may be useful in treating women with obesity and heavy periods, this is a step towards developing more successful and personalised treatments for those suffering with heavy periods, which can be distressing and debilitating.