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Mentally tiring work may increase diabetes risk in women

Mar 2019

Women who find their jobs mentally tiring are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The study findings suggest that mentally draining work, such as teaching, may increase the risk of diabetes in women. This suggests that employers and women should be more aware of the potential health risks associated with mentally tiring work.

Antioxidants may prevent cognitive impairment in diabetes

Oct 2018

Cognitive difficulties in patients with diabetes, caused by repeated episodes of low blood sugar, could be reduced with antioxidants, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that stimulating antioxidant defences in mice reduces cognitive impairments caused by low blood sugar, which could help to improve the quality of life for diabetic patients.

Skin inflammation may increase your risk of type-2 diabetes

Nov 2018

Inflammatory skin disorders, such as psoriasis, may directly increase the risk of type-2 diabetes, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings indicate that improving skin health could be of major importance for the control of blood sugar and lowering diabetes risk.  

Debate - Is the gut or the brain more important in regulating appetite and metabolism?

Nov 2018

Whether gut or brain hormones are more important for the regulation of appetite and metabolism is not clearly defined.  Imbalances in the control of appetite and metabolism can lead to obesity and diabetes, which have a negative impact on people’s health and healthcare costs. In a live debate to be held at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow, leading experts will debate this issue in a session entitled, ‘This house believes that the gut is the conductor of the endocrine orchestra.’  The experts will explore the evidence supporting the roles of gut and brain hormones in metabolism, and discuss how best to target future research and treatment strategies for overweight and diabetic patients.

Routine vitamin B12 screening may prevent irreversible nerve damage in type-2 diabetes

Nov 2018

Patients with type-2 diabetes, taking metformin, should have their vitamin B12 levels assessed more regularly to avoid irreversible nerve damage, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that earlier detection of vitamin B12 deficiency through routine screening of all metformin-treated, type-2 diabetes patients could reduce their risk of developing irreversible, painful and potentially disabling nerve damage.

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